General, In the Community

Washington Trust Invests in the Future of the San Miguel School in Providence, RI

For more than 27 years, a Lasallian middle school in Providence has been providing a high-quality educational experience to hundreds of boys with great potential from low-income communities. The staff at the San Miguel School has worked diligently over the years to build a school culture centered on citizenship, service and personal responsibility.

And after 15 years of impactful operations on Branch Avenue in Providence, the school has launched the STAR Campaign for San Miguel to support needed improvements to the building and to ensure continued success well into the future.

“We’re more than just a safe place for these boys to get a good education,” says John Wolf, Executive Director of the San Miguel School. “It’s our goal to help these boys grow into young men by the time they leave these four walls. Young men who are confident, responsible, and who have a positive vision for the future. Our young men have and will go on to become the ‘do-ers’- the ones in the community who can effect real change and growth for those around them, and whose life trajectories are changed as a result of the education they received here.”

Since the school’s opening in 1993, 365 boys have graduated and the school boasts impressive statistics: 98% of their students graduate high school, 80% go on to post-secondary education and 80% are ‘first in family’ college attendees. Compared to the high school graduation rate in Providence which is currently approximately 80%, and the average Rhode Island graduation rate of 84%, the results clearly showcase the great work that the school is doing.

Washington Trust has pledged a $200,000 investment in the STAR campaign for San Miguel, which will deliver $50,000 each year over the next four years.

“At Washington Trust, our commitment to the community goes deeper than simply providing banking services. It is our mission to help build and sustain healthy families, healthy finances, and healthy communities where we do business,” said Ned Handy, Chairman and CEO at Washington Trust. “We are truly honored to partner with the San Miguel School in this next phase of their development to ensure the sustainability of their model and of their legacy. The San Miguel School is a shining example of an innovative, impactful institution that is dedicated to supporting young boys as they transition to young men, and we could not be prouder to be a part of their movement.”

Washington Trust has had a strong relationship with the San Miguel School for years- our employees have volunteered at the school as mentors, presenters, and guest speakers many times. Washington Trust is lucky to have a San Miguel School alumnus on our team, too! Mitchell Tiah, a Credit Analyst based out of Warwick, attended the San Miguel School from 5th to 7th grade.

“Attending the San Miguel School was one of the best things that could have happened to me,” says Mitchell, now 28. “The school took a boy from Providence and transformed me into a Miguel Man. It helped to inform my perspectives about personal responsibility and service to others at such a crucial developmental stage in my life, and I’m grateful for the education I received, the connections that I made, and the growth that I experienced.”

Mitchell is still involved at the school as a mentor and as an alumni ambassador and was recently named to the School’s Board of Directors. In fact, when Mitchell was awarded the “Community Service Award” at Washington Trust’s annual employee celebration, he selected the San Miguel School as a recipient of a $500 grant from Washington Trust on his behalf.

The San Miguel School’s STAR campaign has secured $4.6 million of the $5 million total required. The campaign has opportunities to support a state-of-the-art STEAM Lab, 21st Century Learning spaces, building upgrades, student support services and more. To support the campaign, visit their website and contact the school here: https://www.sanmiguelprov.org/campaign.

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